E-Scooters are shouting 'Unlock me or I'll call the police' [Video]

Cristian WorthingtonFeedToPost

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How voice alarms built into electric scooters are causing annoyance across America by constantly shouting "unlock me or I"ll call the police" The electric scooters can be unlocked using a smartphone appIf the scooter detects motion before it has been unlocked, an alarm will sound A female...

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How voice alarms built into electric scooters are causing annoyance across America by constantly shouting ‘unlock me or I’ll call the police’

  • The electric scooters can be unlocked using a smartphone app
  • If the scooter detects motion before it has been unlocked, an alarm will sound
  • A female voice recording shouts that she will ‘call the …

San Francisco-based startup Lime fitted  the alarm to its scooters, which shouts out: 'Unlock me or I'll call the police.' The female voice declares the phrase to anybody caught touching the dockless scooter without unlocking it first, via the designated app

The alarm is designed to stop would-be thieves from fiddling with the electronics of the valuable scooters, however, the alert has raised the eyebrows of local residents and lawmakers

Complaints have been flooding in about the alarms fitted to Lime e-scooters and there has been a significant backlash from locals (pictured)

Many people have labelled the dockless scooters as a menace and question their legality. One user took to Twitter to claim the company was exploiting a legal loophole

The craze for electronic scooters has blossomed recently, with Lime facing competition from rivals Spin and Bird (pictured here alongside a Lime scooter). Ride-sharing giant Lyft is also reportedly interested in entering the already crowded niche market

Both Uber and Lyft have been called into question over whether their staffers spy on customer information like trip data

Pictured, a screenshot of Uber's 'God view' tool that it used to spy on drivers and riders. A 2014 report alleged that the company used it to look at trip data from politicians, exes and actresses