How much all-seeing AI surveillance is too much? [Video]

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The AI firm that turned down the CIA: Emotion sensing company"s founder warns authoritarian regimes could use tech "to root out dissent"The CEO of a face-scanning technology company turned down an offer from CIACompany trained AIs to recognize if people are happy or sad, tired or angryThe...

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The AI firm that turned down the CIA: Emotion sensing company’s founder warns authoritarian regimes could use tech ‘to root out dissent’

  • The CEO of a face-scanning technology company turned down an offer from CIA
  • Company trained AIs to recognize if people are happy or sad, tired or angry
  • The company has shunned ‘any security, airport, …

Rana el Kaliouby, CEO of Affectiva, demonstrates their facial recognition technology. Recent advances in AI-powered computer vision have spawned startups, accelerated the race for self-driving cars, and powered sophisticated photo-tagging features

Affectiva builds face-scanning technology for detecting emotions, but its founders decline business opportunities that involve spying on people

Ashley McManus, global marketing director of the Boston-based artificial intelligence firm, Affectiva, demonstrates facial recognition technology that is geared to help detect driver distraction, at their offices in Boston

Rana el Kaliouby, CEO of the Boston-based artificial intelligence firm, Affectiva, demonstrates their facial recognition technology, in Boston. Recent advances in AI-powered computer vision have spawned startups like Affectiva, accelerated the race for self-driving cars and powered the increasingly sophisticated photo-tagging features found on Facebook and Google