Second epileptic boy to be allowed cannabis oil after U-turn [Video]

Cristian WorthingtonFeedToPost

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Home Secretary Sajid Javid granted "urgent" licence for Billy"s cannabis oil Landmark decision could trigger a change in the law according to Whitehall It could mean Alfie Dingley, from Warwickshire, gets access to same treatmentHis mother Hannah Deacon was refused it despite him...

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  • Home Secretary Sajid Javid granted ‘urgent’ licence for Billy’s cannabis oil
  • Landmark decision could trigger a change in the law according to Whitehall
  • It could mean Alfie Dingley, from Warwickshire, gets access to same treatment
  • His mother Hannah Deacon was refused it despite him suffering 30 fits a day

Another British boy with epilepsy could be …

Alfie Dingley (pictured left with is mother Hannah Deacon) could become the second person in the UK with epilepsy to be granted cannabis oil treatment after the Home Office allowed Billy Caldwell permission yesterday

Alfie, six (pictured) suffers from a rare form of the disease that can cause up to 30 seizures a day

Billy Caldwell (pictured in hospital) was left fighting for his life after being deprived of cannabis oil at Heathrow Airport. But now the Home Office has given the drugs back

Alfie's (pictured) mother Hannah Deacon, of Kenilworth, Warwickshire, had begged the Home Office to let her treat her son with marijuana but they refused. Now things could change

Government advisers made it legal to buy CBD in 2016

Billy Caldwell is pictured with a sign campaigning for other young epilepsy patients to be allowed cannabis oil

Home Secretary Sajid Javid stepped in to issue an 'urgent' licence, allowing Billy to be treated with the illegal cannabis oil, after he was rushed to hospital following a seizure

His mother Charlotte said the Home Office has made just one bottle available - a 20-day supply - to be administered by hospital doctors

Ms Caldwell said the week had been ¿a dreadful, horrendous and cruel experience¿ for Billy and herself
According to Ms Caldwell, he told her she could apply for a special licence but that might cost £20,000 and take five months

Ms Caldwell said her battle had ¿nothing to do with recreational cannabis use¿. However, her case has been backed by Paul Birch, a US internet entrepreneur who has openly pushed for full legalisation of cannabis in the UK