U.S. and Europe clash over global supersonic jet noise standards [Video]

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U.S. and Europe clash over noise in race to bring supersonic passenger jets back to the skiesU.S. regulators are weighing rule changes to allow testing of early-stage jets American-made business and passenger jets due in service by the mid-2020sUnited States and European countries -...

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U.S. and Europe clash over noise in race to bring supersonic passenger jets back to the skies

  • U.S. regulators are weighing rule changes to allow testing of early-stage jets
  • American-made business and passenger jets due in service by the mid-2020s
  • United States and European countries – including France, Germany and Britain – are squaring off over …

Fifteen years after Concorde's last flight, U.S. regulators are weighing rule changes to allow testing of early-stage supersonic jets, amid plans for American-made business and small passenger jets due in service by the mid-2020s. Pictured, the Aerion AS2, the world's first supersonic business jet, being developed by Lockheed Martin Corp partnering with plane maker Aerion Corp of Reno

AERION AS2

Flight times from London to New York could be slashed to just 3 hours 15 minutes by 2025, if plans revealed by Boom Supersonic go ahead. Pictured are concept images of the full-sized, 55-seater aircraft, alongside the XB-1 mini version that will begin testing next year

SPIKE S-512

LBFD aims to cut out the noisy sonic booms that echoed above cities in the era of Concorde, while travelling at speeds of 1,100mph (Mach 1.4 / 1,700 km/h). Pictured is an concept design of the Quiet Supersonic Transport (QueSST) low-boom flight demonstrator (LBFD)

Concorde was a turbojet-powered supersonic passenger jet that was operated until 2003. It had a maximum speed over twice the speed of sound at Mach 2.04 and could seat 92 to 128 passengers